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If your eyes are guilty of betraying your lack of sleep, treat them to This Works’s No Wrinkles Tired Eyes which – as the name suggests – is dedicated to hiding the signs of late nights and early starts. No, it’s not as good as getting your full eight hours, but it does include hyaluronic acid to plump, plant extracts to encourage cell renewal and a secret “superblend” to tackle dark circles.
Retinoids are related to Vitamin A, and they’re well-documented to help the skin slough off old cells and produce new ones. They vary in strength, and as cosmetic chemist and consultant Kevin Gallagher explained, their strength has an immediate trade-off: the stronger and more effective the retinoid, the harsher it is on skin. Retinoids can cause side-effects like peeling and redness at high enough doses. Over-the-counter retinoid creams typically use gentler forms — you’ll need a need a prescription for extremely potent wrinkle creams — but if you have sensitive skin, know that retinoids are more likely to cause irritation than peptides.
So although it can be inconvenient, the best advice is to make sure you take them out before hitting the sack. Instead of waiting until the last sleepy minute, one trick is to remove your contact lenses in the late afternoon or evening—so you don’t forget or get lazy, doze off in them, and wake up looking like a blowfish.
February 20, 2018 – We’ve updated our review to reflect the most recent research into anti-aging ingredients. We’ve also tested dozens of new finalists. We’re excited to recommend six new picks, all packed with the most effective ingredients we could find to help your skin battle signs of aging.
Pink eye doesn’t come with many warning signs, explains Dr. McLaughlin, but once you notice symptoms, it’s important to take special care. If it appears to be bacterial, check in with an MD about getting a prescription for antibacterial eye drops to speed healing.
Whether you choose a retinoid- or peptide-based product, take your time adding new ingredients to your skin care routine, particularly if you have sensitive skin. Starting by applying the cream once or twice a week, and give your skin time to adjust to the new routine. This is an easy way to check whether your skin is sensitive to the ingredients in your new eye cream — irritated skin will feel itchy and look red. Even if you don’t see irritation right away, keep an eye on your skin as you move from applying eye cream every few days to a daily routine. If you’re using a retinoid-based night cream, irritation or redness may be a sign to switch to a peptide-based day cream instead.
“I’ve got plenty of undereye concerns that need correction: puffiness, dark circles, and an general look of exhaustion are pretty much regular fixtures on my face. After tapping a single pump of Auto Correct under both eyes with my fingertips, there’s noticeable deflation and lift to my sleep-deprived skin in under 5 minutes. I still use concealer, but I don’t have to layer it on the way I used to.” —Amber Rambharose, beauty editor
Enhance your beauty routine with a healthy dose of eye cream. These creams are recommended by dermatologists for treating dry skin and reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and using a trusted brand of cream on your eyes helps keep your face young and vibrant. Cream shadow is a popular product you might enjoy, as it allows you to wear a rejuvenating cream along with your other makeup. The Revlon Colorstay Smoky Shadow Stick Torch, Wet n Wild cream shadow stick and Boots Protect & Perfect are all fantastic options to consider.
VLCC’s Skin Defense Almond Under Eye Cream claims to be the perfect caretaker for your eyes. It contains chamomile extract, olive oil, wheat germ extract, and vitamin E. The product helps soothe and moisturize your skin while treating puffiness and dark circles.
“I have monster bags under my eyes every morning (#nightowlproblems), so I depend on this shea butter and caffeine-packed cream to help with both long term hydration and immediate results. I roll the cooling massage tool up and outward under my eyes to quickly de-puff, then lightly tap on the cream with my ring finger to nourish. It’s basically a masters class called Faking Sleep 101.” —Jen Mulrow, assistant beauty editor
Elevate your head when you sleep. It’s not unusual to have puffy eyes upon waking. A possible explanation for this may be that when you are lying down for several hours in a horizontal position and then stand up, the fluid that was resting under your eyes is suddenly being pulled down by gravity. To reduce it, you can try using an extra pillow while sleeping so that the fluid is not as drastically drawn down when you get up.[5]
Treat your allergies. Puffy eyes are often caused by allergies, which inflame the face and cause water to collect there. You might see a big difference if you treat your seasonal allergies with a good allergy medication.
While some degree of puffiness may be normal for a given individual, factors such as age and fatigue may make the swelling more prominent. The periorbital tissues are most noticeably swollen immediately after waking, perhaps due to the gravitational redistribution of fluid in the horizontal position.
fantastic web site. I would love to know if anyone knows how to order groceries over the internet and get send to your house? I have a disease and it is hard getting out and going to the grocery store.Also my daughter is getting married and Does any one have any ideas for gifts to give the people who attened the wedding/ .thanks kellee
[…] Keep the delicate skin around the eyes hydrated and protected by massaging in eye cream.  Look for an age-defying cream rich in peptides and antioxidants, or go DIY with this  super simple, but super luxurious homemade eye cream from Redefined Mom. […]
Hyaluronic acid is most effective when it can get into the deeper layers of the skin — which is why it is a common ingredient for fillers and injections. But in topical creams, it often has a hard time getting past the outer layer of skin because it is comprised of fairly large molecules. As a workaround, the most effective eye cream will use sodium hyaluronate instead, a derivative that is more easily absorbed into the skin because it has smaller molecules. We looked only at products that contained sodium hyaluronate (although we didn’t ding them for including HA).
Need to know your skin type?Paula’s Choice breaks skin types up into three categories: Dry, Normal, and Oily. They advise washing your face, and waiting two hours without applying any products. If your skin looks flaky or feels tight, you have dry skin. Shiny and slick? Oily. Neither, but smooth? Normal, or you might have a combination of oily and dry sections.
Many creams, gels, and lotions you’ll find over the counter contain 2 percent of hydroquinone. You can get higher concentrations by prescription from your dermatologist. You’ll need to use these products regularly to see lasting results.
If you’re one of the many women who think eye creams are just another way for the cosmetic industry to get you to buy more skin care products, dermatologist Kenneth Beer, MD, PA, says you should reconsider. The skin around your eye is the thinnest layer of skin on your entire body, and therefore the most sensitive, he says. So using a cream made specifically for your eyes is crucial, especially as you age.
To avoid fluid retention and keep alcohol from setting up that anti-diuretic effect, try sticking to no more than one drink per night if you’re female, and two if you’re male. These are the CDC guidelines for moderate drinking, but if you still notice eye bloat, consider giving up the booze for good and limiting it to special occasions only. 
So what else can you do? Kevin Gallagher noted that antioxidants are important for preventing the development of aged skin via sun exposure. They’re another ingredient that helps your body prevent damaged skin cells. We again consulted skincare expert Paula Begoun’s ingredient database to ensure all of our finalists contained effective antioxidants (we looked for antioxidants with a “good” or “best” rating). Only one product didn’t meet the mark at this point: SkinMedica TNS Illuminating Eye Cream, which we removed from consideration.
I mix beeswax pellets with just a little bit of rosehip oil (don’t want it to be greasy) and some quality frankincense oil (I order my oil through Tropical Traditions). The beeswax doesn’t melt into my eyes quite as quickly as the coconut oil, thus it stays off my eyeballs and I don’t get blurry vision. I’ve come to know that using this at night before bed is the best way. During the daytime I mix frankincense with grapeseed oil (soaks in right away) and use it under my powdered mineral make-up and it works out fine. At night I want something heavier though, so I stay with the beeswax.
The skin around the eyes is more fragile, more prone to dryness, and quicker to show age and fatigue. Squinting and constant movement of the eyes also hasten the appearance of lines and wrinkles, and fluids collect under the eyes and cause puffiness and dark circles. Eye creams can address some of these issues.

Vitamin E 300–400 IU per day; talk with eye care professional about your individual needs Reduces effects of nearsightedness; improves function of muscles, blood vessels, skin, and nerves around eyes Wheat germ oil; whole raw seeds and nuts; cold-pressed vegetable oils; soybeans
Puffy eyes are usually only a temporary cosmetic worry, but occasionally, individuals become concerned about the cosmetic effect of periorbital swelling and seek surgical correction. Severe and persistent puffiness may be a sign of other serious medical conditions.
There are hundreds of so-called ‘remedies’ for puffy eyes floating around the Internet. It seems that almost every day someone is posting a new blog or YouTube video about: HOW TO GET RID OF PUFFY EYES. Or, GET RID OF PUFFY EYES NATURALLY. Or, HOME REMEDIES FOR SWOLLEN EYES. The fact of the matter is that almost all of these home remedies are urban myths. But it also seems that people like to fabricate new urban myths simply for web recognition.
I made the anti aging eue cream with coconut oil and vitamin E capsules. I refrigeratoed it for several hours and took it out to use. For some reason it liquidifies when I use it. Is this suppose to happen or should it stay creamy?
“Sometimes the sinus cavities behind the eyes become inflamed due to inhalation of the allergens through the nasal passages,” says Lisa Ellman-Grunther, MD, an allergist at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in New York City, in an email to Health. If allergies are the reason for your puffy eyes, they’ll likely also be itchy and watery—another fun effect of allergens. You might also notice dryness and flakiness on the skin, particularly your eyelids, says Dr. Ellman-Grunther.
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Toward that end, Dr. Rhonda Klein, a dermatologist based in Connecticut, told us to avoid fragrances, “especially if you have sensitive skin or notice any skin irritation.” No product will be truly scentless, but ones with synthetic fragrances (usually written as “fragrance” or “parfum” on ingredients lists) can be particularly irritating.
Some of the causes of this fluid retention are relatively harmless and unrelated to a more serious issue, such as not getting enough sleep or consuming foods with too much sodium. Other times, the puffiness is a sign something that needs to be addressed by a doctor, like an infection, says Randy McLaughlin, OD, a professor of optometry at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center.
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