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Fluid retention – Many conditions (including pregnancy and hormonal variations with menstruation) can lead to the retention of fluid, particularly in the subcutaneous tissues. These conditions can cause swelling around the eyes to be more prominent. (This cause can by partly alleviated by raising the head of one’s bed.)[citation needed]
A cool washcloth that you rest on your eyelids for about 10 minutes can reduce eye puffiness. This can help drain excess fluid from under your eye. A compress of green or black tea bags may also do the trick. The tea contains antioxidants that can constrict blood vessels and reduce puffiness.
Leave your contacts in for too long, and it could leave you with puffy eyes. A contact len is “a barrier to the eye,” explains Dr. McLaughlin. This barrier prevents oxygen from reaching the eyes, which can make your corneas swell. If you sleep in your lenses, you’re putting more stress on your corneas and make the swelling even more pronounced.
This is also a simply way to get rid of puffy eyes. For this remedy take a glass of warm water and add half teaspoon of salt in it and mix it properly. Make sure the water is not too hot. Now soak cotton balls or wool eye pads in this warm saline water and apply them over your eyelids for a few minutes. Repeat the process for at least half an hour. After some time, your eyes will not have the puffiness.
First things first. “The skin around the eye is very thin and sensitive and will not always tolerate the same products that your cheeks and forehead can tolerate,” says Dr. Tsippora Shainhouse, MD, FAAD, a board-certified dermatologist in Beverly Hills and clinical instructor at the University of Southern California. The best eye cream should make your skin feel younger, not red and itchy.
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Excessive alcohol intake causes all kinds of body issues, including bloating all over. So it makes sense that drinking too much contributes to puffy eyes as well. “Alcohol can lower an anti-diuretic hormone in your body, which causes puffiness,” says Dr. McLaughlin. 
Dermology Eye Cream is the most complete eye cream on the market since it reduces* the appearance of dark circles, eye bags, fine lines, wrinkles and eye puffiness. Also, almost all of the customer feedback and reviews are positive saying it is really a fast-acting and highly effective eye cream.
Also worth considering are NIOD Fractionated Eye-Contour Concentrate, and Eco Your Skin VOLUFILINE15 EYE ESSENCE. NIOD was the only true eye serum that made it to our list of finalists — it’s a liquid that comes in a dropper. It doesn’t absorb as quickly as Drunk Elephant or Mizon, with all of our testers reporting moderately oily residue. Eco Your Skin is heavier still — we almost bumped it into our “heavy creams” category. Its standout features is the size of its bottle. Unlike most of our finalists, which usually cap at 15 mL, Eco Your Skin comes in a 50 mL bottle. This helps explain its higher price tag ($70).
Common urban myths about how to reduce puffy eyes include putting cold spoons on your eyes to reduce the inflammation. It is claimed that the cold steel soothes the skin and reduces the puffiness and swelling. They even claim it will help tighten up the skin and relax the blood vessels. There is no scientific support for these claims. Another common remedy is to rest wet tea bags on your eyes to draw out the puffiness. You are supposed to soak tea bags in hot water and then let them cool down, and place them on your eyes for 15 minutes.  Some blogs claim that tea contains anti-irritant properties. This is not true. Tea leaf does contain antioxidants and caffeine; but certainly not anti-irritants.
You eat well, avoid alcohol, and always score a healthy 7-8 hours of sleep per night. Yet your undereye area sometimes resembles a tiny pillow. What’s going on? Some of us are simply genetically prone to eye puffiness, says Dr. McLaughlin. And this inherited predisposition tends to not show up until later in life, well into your 30s or 40s (though it can strike at younger ages as well).
Treat your allergies. Puffy eyes are often caused by allergies, which inflame the face and cause water to collect there. You might see a big difference if you treat your seasonal allergies with a good allergy medication.
Many cosmetic companies now produce colored creams that can easily improve your appearance. Almay i-Color products are one great example, giving you a dramatic boost of color while simultaneously protecting your skin against the effects of aging. Black Radiance cr?me eye color is available in a number of shades to enhance your skincare routine.
We started by compiling a list of every eye cream we could find — 404 of them. We pulled from popular online beauty retailers like Ulta and Sephora plus retailers like Walgreens and Target, then we added in recommendations by established beauty brands like Cosmopolitan, Vogue, and Refinery29. We also made sure our list included South Korean beauty products — one of the hottest sources for skin care treatments. We looked at serums, creams, and lotions indiscriminately (although we did skip masks and eye rollers).
Looking for a retinoid-based eye cream? A medium-weight formula is best place to start if you have normal skin and no pre-existing texture preferences. These creams leave your skin feeling moisturized — you won’t be left wondering whether you remembered to put them on — but, at the same time, they aren’t unpleasantly greasy. After testing, two of our retinoid-based contenders fit this category: Kate Somerville Line Release Under Eye Repair Cream and Chanel Le Lift Creme Yeux Firming Anti-Wrinkle Eye Cream.
Himalaya’s Under Eye Cream claims to clear pigmentation, dark circles, and blemishes. It also helps brighten and smoothe the area around your eyes. The product claims to reduce dark circles by 80% within a month. It also claims to reduce wrinkles and fine lines by 28% within a month.
Try a neti pot. Use this gizmo, which looks like a small teapot, to pour salt water into one nostril and let it drain out the other. It sounds weird, but it might help flush out all that extra moisture in your sinuses from seasonal allergies, colds, or infections.
Although eye creams may seem like they are expensive for the amount, they last a long time. A little goes a way. You only need a pea sized amount. Apply it with your ring finger with light patting and let your skin absorb it well.
Fragrance sensitivity is nothing new: a March 2017 study published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports found that exposure to fragrances can lead to a host of negative reactions, like migraines and difficulty breathing. And 14% of people in the study reported having eye issues when they were within smelling distance of certain scents.
The first and most common remedy is to ensure you are properly hydrated. Drink at least 8 x 8 oz glasses of water a day. It might sound like a lot, but simply leave your glass full and in front of you all day and before you know it you will consume 8 glasses by dinner.
Store shelves groan under the weight of creams and lotions made to reduce puffy eyes. Try them out to see if one works for you. Here’s one product to avoid: Don’t use old-fashioned hemorrhoid cream. It can irritate the skin around your eyes. Try a retinol eye cream instead.
Like regular sugar, artificial sweeteners such as saccharin and aspartame promote inflammation all over the body, including in the eye area. Inflammation happens when your immune system floods your body with white blood cells, a defense mechanism for fighting off foreign organisms such as bacteria or a virus. When your immune system does this often, it can have a spillover effect that leads to “joint pain, fatigue, and damage to the blood vessels,” Scott Zashin, MD, clinical professor at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, told Health in a previous interview.
To make it easier for you to find the best products, our team of skin care experts has thoroughly inspected each eye cream on the market and have come up with the best brands available today. We have also checked the customer feedback on the different brands of eye creams to help determine the most effective and safest products currently being sold on the market.
One of the most common home remedies, as mentioned above, is the temporary use of hemorrhoid creams and ointments to reduce the puffiness in eyelids. A common active ingredient in these preparations is phenylephrine, a medication that constricts blood vessels, reducing their diameter.
The trick is to find the best eye cream for your skin’s needs. I feel like you’ve been duped by the eye creams promising to erase your dark circles, puffiness and fine lines – I have tried all of them. Right now, I found two that I like from Made From Earth – the Chamomile Eye cream and the Cucumber Gel. I use both on my face and work better than the more expensive creams I bought online.
The skin around your eyes is very thin, making them extremely sensitive. When skin here comes into contact with allergens floating in the air such as pollen, animal dander, or dust mites, swelling is the result. Adding to the puffiness are allergens that reach the eyes through your nose. 

Yes, it’s expensive. But La Mer’s Lifting Eye Serum really does deliver, using kelp-infused actives and the brand’s Stretch Matrix Complex to lift, tighten and contour the area around the eyes. The formula is lightweight, gel-like and refreshing – apply to drooping lids to lift and smooth.
As you might have realized by now, I’m a bit of a Tatcha stan. This eye serum doesn’t do a whole lot for dark circles, per se, but it’s incredible for hydrating and giving your eyes a lift. I know it’s on the pricey side, but it really is quite effective when it comes to fine lines, wrinkles, and hydration. The Okinawa red algae, honeysuckle leaf, and caffeine ingredients promise “instantly-visible firming, reduced puffiness, and plumping hydration to diminish fine lines.” It’s also the most luxurious applicator I’ve ever used — the ceramic applicator cools down as you use it, which helps with puffiness in its own right.
To reduce allergy-induced puffiness, try over-the-counter eye drops or a saline eye rinse, which wash the allergens out of your peepers. For irritated skin, lubricated ointments not only act as a barrier between the skin and allergens, but it also can soothe and ease redness. A nasal spray might help relieve sinus pressure and in turn de-puff your eyes.
Just like the rest of your body bloats and swells during certain times of the month, your eyes can actually do the same. They should go down after a few days, and if they don’t, it may be another cause.
Puffiness is a buildup of fluid and blood under the eyes. Some studies show that caffeine can help circulation, which could reduce puffiness. Other studies show that cold temperatures are just as effective to treat puffiness. That’s why some people refrigerate their eye creams.
Allergy season and watery, puffy eyes go hand-in-hand. Here’s the good news: Those over-the-counter medicines that you take for your allergies, colds, or sinus infections can dry up your puffy eyes — along with your runny nose. 
Eye creams are usually packaged in very small jars and can cost anywhere form $13 for a 0.5 oz. jar at the local pharmacy to $100 per 0.5 oz. jar online or at a boutique store. That’s equivalent to $3,200 per pound! 
Only one of our retinoid-based products had heavy enough coverage to fall into our “heavy coverage” category: SkinMedica Uplifting Eye Serum ($60). Most of our testers weren’t huge fans of this option. It was repeatedly called out for being sticky and “gloopy,” and several testers felt that it didn’t absorb into their skin at all, instead sitting in a thick layer on top of it. That said, if you have extremely dry skin, SkinMedica has the power to provide an extra level of hydration that we didn’t get anywhere else, with one tester describing the cream as “thick and luxurious.” It all comes down to skin type and personal preference: What feels overpowering on oily skin is likely to be a blessed relief to someone constantly battling dryness.
I’m still figuring out what exactly does and does not make me have a weird allergic reaction under my eyes. However, I recently picked this up on the recommendation of the girls at the K-beauty store oo35mm (for dark circles and wrinkles), and it’s given me no trouble at all! So far, I’m very impressed.
If you’re one of the many women who think eye creams are just another way for the cosmetic industry to get you to buy more skin care products, dermatologist Kenneth Beer, MD, PA, says you should reconsider. The skin around your eye is the thinnest layer of skin on your entire body, and therefore the most sensitive, he says. So using a cream made specifically for your eyes is crucial, especially as you age.
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