To reduce allergy-induced puffiness, try over-the-counter eye drops or a saline eye rinse, which wash the allergens out of your peepers. For irritated skin, lubricated ointments not only act as a barrier between the skin and allergens, but it also can soothe and ease redness. A nasal spray might help relieve sinus pressure and in turn de-puff your eyes.
Allergy season and watery, puffy eyes go hand-in-hand. Here’s the good news: Those over-the-counter medicines that you take for your allergies, colds, or sinus infections can dry up your puffy eyes — along with your runny nose. 
Treat your allergies. Puffy eyes are often caused by allergies, which inflame the face and cause water to collect there. You might see a big difference if you treat your seasonal allergies with a good allergy medication.
If I don’t wear makeup, it is inevitable that someone will approach me and ask if I had a late night. Something about my under-eye skin says, “I’ve never slept a day in my life.” And it’s not just me, either — my mother and sister are the exact same way. Last year, we held a conference over Christmas to discuss our collective genetic flaw: sunken, dark Robert Durst eyes. Since I’m the skin-care expert of the bunch, I promised I’d do all I could to figure out what would help. And as a result, I’ve tried just about every eye product out there. As it turns out, my sensitive skin is especially sensitive to eye treatments — I’ll often get redness and irritation when I’m trying new eye products. But after months of research (and more than a few rashes), I feel I’ve finally reached a place where I can confidently share with you (and the long-suffering female members of my family) the best eye products for dark, dry, puffy-in-the-morning serial-killer eyes.
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[…] a big plastic tube.  Next I use a 3 ingredient toner, followed by a super cheap and homemade eye cream, and moisturize with a custom oil blend that I just started using recently. Body Unburdened also […]

Apply an astringent substance to your eyes. You can buy astringent creams and tonics that help reduce puffiness by tightening the skin around your eyes. Soak two cotton balls in astringent cream or tonic, lie back and close your eyes, and place the cotton balls over your eyes. Let the astringent soak in for about 10 minutes, then remove the cotton balls and rinse your face.
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There are two types of alcohols in cosmetics. The good guys are the “fatty alcohols,” like cetyl alcohol. This group of ingredients soothes and moisturizes and is a great addition to many moisturizers. The “bad” alcohols include denatured alcohol, methanol, benzyl alcohol, and ethyl alcohol. These ingredients are sometimes added because they help active ingredients penetrate further into your skin — which sounds great, until you learn that bad alcohols achieve this by breaking down the outer layers of your skin. They can eventually hurt the skin’s ability to retain moisture. We took a hard line on these drying alcohols, cutting any products that included them.
Our skin is constantly shedding old cells and regrowing. Beginning in our twenties, however, this regeneration process slows down by as much as 30% to 50%: Skin can take twice as long to replace damaged cells, resulting in a less youthful appearance. To avoid this slow-down, the most effective eye cream will encourage your body to produce collagen (a building block for new, healthy skin). There are two ingredient types that promote collagen growth: peptides and retinoids.
This eye treatment from Kiehl’s is an old favorite of mine — I almost always have it in my medicine cabinet. The application process is kind of annoying, as you have to dip your finger into a sticky pot, which I don’t love, but this eye treatment is super hydrating as well as slightly pigmented, which means it helps with overtime treatment and brightening. This is worth trying if you want a little bit of lift to your eyes, but don’t necessarily feel like putting on concealer.
If you’re one of the many women who think eye creams are just another way for the cosmetic industry to get you to buy more skin care products, dermatologist Kenneth Beer, MD, PA, says you should reconsider. The skin around your eye is the thinnest layer of skin on your entire body, and therefore the most sensitive, he says. So using a cream made specifically for your eyes is crucial, especially as you age.
Our two other finalists in this category were Philosophy Miracle Worker Eye Cream and Clinique Smart Custom-Repair Eye Treatment. Both absorbed easily and performed well, but testers weren’t quite as enthusiastic about them, lodging a handful of complaints about residue that felt sticky or overly drying. Still, if you want to explore additional brands, feedback was largely positive and both creams have all the powerhouse ingredients necessary to get the job done. All of our pump-based creams cost about the same — Estee ($66), Philosophy ($68), and Clinique ($50) — while our $14 rollerball surprised us with its performance and price.
Eye care professionals recommend using a washcloth dipped in cold water, which has the same effect. The reason cucumbers are not recommended is that food sometimes contains bacteria. Putting a possible bacteria source directly onto the eyes can lead to eye infections. The same is true of tea bags.
Here’s what happens: As you age, fat deposits that typically support the eyes begin to sag, causing a puffing effect, says Dr. McLaughlin. The tissue and muscles surrounding the eyes weaken as well, adding to the swollen appearance. Puffiness caused by genetics and age isn’t usually a medical concern. “It’s reasonable to say you’re predisposed to having puffy eyes. I’ve seen people whose skin hasn’t aged a bit, but it can be the other way too,” he adds.
As we get older, our skin regenerates more slowly, loses elasticity, and can appear sunken. Moisturizing helps skin look fuller — minimizing wrinkles — and gives it the water it needs to repair and regenerate itself.
If puffy eyes are your problem, you should try ice-rolling. You know the old trick of putting cold spoons under your eyes? Well, this is a modernized version of that. Keep it in the freezer, and when you want to use it, let it sit out for a second so that it’s not painfully freezing, then roll it gently over your under-eyes. This also can be used on places other than just your under-eyes — it can actually help with inflammation and redness from breakouts and rashes as well. Also, I’ll just say — this feels incredible on your head when you’re hungover.
The incorrect way of putting eye cream, or any type of cream, on and rubbing it in would be not to wash your hands before the process. Even if you are at home and didn’t go out, bacteria are already on your hands. That’s why we wash our hands before we eat.
Elevate your head when you sleep. It’s not unusual to have puffy eyes upon waking. A possible explanation for this may be that when you are lying down for several hours in a horizontal position and then stand up, the fluid that was resting under your eyes is suddenly being pulled down by gravity. To reduce it, you can try using an extra pillow while sleeping so that the fluid is not as drastically drawn down when you get up.[5]
Enhance your beauty routine with a healthy dose of eye cream. These creams are recommended by dermatologists for treating dry skin and reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and using a trusted brand of cream on your eyes helps keep your face young and vibrant. Cream shadow is a popular product you might enjoy, as it allows you to wear a rejuvenating cream along with your other makeup. The Revlon Colorstay Smoky Shadow Stick Torch, Wet n Wild cream shadow stick and Boots Protect & Perfect are all fantastic options to consider.
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Parabens are a class of preservatives commonly found in cosmetics, as well as other hygiene products like toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. They’re used to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi — things that you absolutely do not want around your eyes. But they’ve recently come under scrutiny out of a fear that paraben exposure is linked to some types of cancer. One of the larger questions surrounding parabens, particularly since 90% of typical grocery items contain them, is whether they are safe in small doses but become harmful as they accumulate in large doses. In other words, you might be fine if you have parabens only in your toothpaste, but not if they’re in every product you use on a daily basis.
Jump up ^ http://www.google.com/patents/US5643587?dq=live+yeast+cell+derivative&hl=en&sa=X&ei=sAPGUNbYH4vIswaMtICQBQ&ved=0CEkQ6AEwBg Composition and method for under-eye skin lightening USPTO Patent number: 5643587
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“I’m one of the people who thinks eye creams are kind of BS—a regular light moisturizer does that trick just fine for me—but I’ve recently noticed how damn puffy my area looks. Blame it on December cheer, an excess of salt, and not enough water, but I started using this collagen-rich gel—which I keep in the fridge—and found it actually works to de-puff and hydrate. It also promises to blur fine lines, which I didn’t experience yet, but I’m planning to stick with it, mainly thanks to its powerful helix complex—an organic compound rich in allantoin, collagen, elastin, and glycolic acid.” —Perrie Samotin, digital deputy editor
Some eye cream types contain ingredients that help firm the skin, like caffeine, retinol, or vitamin C. These may temporarily provide a firmer look to the eyes. Those creams that help to lighten skin around the eyes, especially dark circles may contain ingredients such as hydroquinone or Vitamin K. Occasionally you’ll find creams that offer anti-aging or firming benefits and reduce dark circles.
Part of Estée Lauder’s bestselling Advanced Night Repair range, the sciencey-sounding Eye Concentrate Matrix uses that same anti-ageing technology to target fine lines, wrinkles, puffiness, dark circles and dryness while you sleep. The serum texture makes it a pleasure to use, too.
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