Parabens are a class of preservatives commonly found in cosmetics, as well as other hygiene products like toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. They’re used to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi — things that you absolutely do not want around your eyes. But they’ve recently come under scrutiny out of a fear that paraben exposure is linked to some types of cancer. One of the larger questions surrounding parabens, particularly since 90% of typical grocery items contain them, is whether they are safe in small doses but become harmful as they accumulate in large doses. In other words, you might be fine if you have parabens only in your toothpaste, but not if they’re in every product you use on a daily basis.
“When I’m sleep deprived, there’s no hiding it: the already dark circles under my eyes get even darker. This eye cream really helps keep my exhaustion a secret and works as an amazing base for undereye concealer, since it has a touch of shimmer and some brightening pigments.” —Blake Newby, beauty assistant
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Water.org is an international nonprofit organization that has positively transformed millions of lives around the world through access to safe water and sanitation. Founded by Gary White and Matt Damon, Water.org pioneers innovative, market-driven solutions to the global water crisis — breaking down barriers to give families hope, health and the opportunity to break the cycle of poverty.
Iron deficiency anemia is a condition where the blood is lacking red blood cells. These cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to tissues in the body. Iron deficiency can cause dark circles under the eyes and even pale skin. Other symptoms include things like:
The best thing for puffiness is to go cold. Tom Vichroski of CRDR Consulting, Inc., a member of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, recommends cool ingredients — literally. Keeping your cream in the fridge is the equivalent of giving your eye area a cold shower and helps reduce early-morning puffiness.
Your doctor will want to rule out other possible causes that can contribute to the swelling, such as thyroid disease, infection or an allergy. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in the eyes (ophthalmologist), plastic surgery or plastic surgery of the eyes (oculoplastic surgeon).
Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism – Facial puffiness and periorbital swelling occur due to infiltration with the mucopolysaccharides hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate,[4] pulling fluid into the interstitial space by osmosis.
Puffiness is a buildup of fluid and blood under the eyes. Some studies show that caffeine can help circulation, which could reduce puffiness. Other studies show that cold temperatures are just as effective to treat puffiness. That’s why some people refrigerate their eye creams.
We’ve all experienced getting a slight shock when you check your face in the mirror and find your eyes are looking swollen or puffier than usual. However, puffy eyes are extremely common and can be caused by a variety of different things – from environmental factors to underlying health problems.
Dark circles can be the result of your particular genetics, a circulatory issue (your blood flow needs a boost) — or a natural consequence of aging. Dr. Greene explained that as we age, our facial anatomy shifts, which contributes to how smooth or uneven the skin around the eyes appears. Skin damage from ultraviolet light causes skin laxity. Areas that once appeared full may now look shallow. Hydration with ingredients like sodium hyaluronate can help against shallowness, but most eye creams for dark circles rely on pigments to color over dark circles, or reflective materials like mica or pearl dust to provide the optical illusion of fullness. Whether these work depends heavily on matching your skin color and tone.
This eye treatment from Kiehl’s is an old favorite of mine — I almost always have it in my medicine cabinet. The application process is kind of annoying, as you have to dip your finger into a sticky pot, which I don’t love, but this eye treatment is super hydrating as well as slightly pigmented, which means it helps with overtime treatment and brightening. This is worth trying if you want a little bit of lift to your eyes, but don’t necessarily feel like putting on concealer.
Prescription-strength retinoid creams are another option for stubborn wrinkles, although they should be used with care. They have the potential to cause peeling, flaking, dryness, or acne flare-ups if you have sensitive skin. A dermatologist will be able to work with you to figure out what strength of retinoid is appropriate for your skin, monitor whether your skin is reacting well or poorly, and adjust your prescription accordingly.
Apply Preparation-H. Hemorrhoid creams such as Preparation-H help constrict blood vessels, which in turn reduces puffiness. Gently dab some on around the eye with your ring finger on days when you notice excessive swelling.[4]

“I’ve been fighting dark circles and bagginess under my eyes since basically forever. Over the years, I’ve tried more eye creams than I can count and can say with absolute certainty that this is the best of the bunch. It has visibly faded the darkness under my eyes and has a teeny bit of shimmer that makes me look alert and refreshed. It totally eliminates puffiness, strengthened and hydrated my delicate skin, while also obliterating the fine lines and wrinkles that have been trying to make an appearance there this past year. It’s definitely a splurge, but it lasts a long time.” —Meg Adams, engineering manager
VLCC’s Skin Defense Almond Under Eye Cream claims to be the perfect caretaker for your eyes. It contains chamomile extract, olive oil, wheat germ extract, and vitamin E. The product helps soothe and moisturize your skin while treating puffiness and dark circles.
The skin around your eyes is very thin, making them extremely sensitive. When skin here comes into contact with allergens floating in the air such as pollen, animal dander, or dust mites, swelling is the result. Adding to the puffiness are allergens that reach the eyes through your nose. 
If you are drinking water late in the day your body may not have time to flush it out before bedtime, resulting in morning puffiness. This should resolve itself in a few hours. Otherwise you are probably retaining water due to consuming too much salt. Try to reduce your sodium intake.
Hyaluronic acid is most effective when it can get into the deeper layers of the skin — which is why it is a common ingredient for fillers and injections. But in topical creams, it often has a hard time getting past the outer layer of skin because it is comprised of fairly large molecules. As a workaround, the most effective eye cream will use sodium hyaluronate instead, a derivative that is more easily absorbed into the skin because it has smaller molecules. We looked only at products that contained sodium hyaluronate (although we didn’t ding them for including HA).
Hi Amit, you can use any of the cream mentioned above in the article. To get rid of dark circle you can also try some of the home remedies such as, applying tomatoes. Tomatoes are highly effective for treating dark circles. You can prepare a mixture using 1 teaspoon of fresh tomato juice, ½ teaspoon of lemon juice, a pinch of turmeric and gram flour (besan). Apply it gently under the eye and leave it for ten minutes and then rinse it off. For more info and tips you can check our other articles given below:
This is also a simply way to get rid of puffy eyes. For this remedy take a glass of warm water and add half teaspoon of salt in it and mix it properly. Make sure the water is not too hot. Now soak cotton balls or wool eye pads in this warm saline water and apply them over your eyelids for a few minutes. Repeat the process for at least half an hour. After some time, your eyes will not have the puffiness.
Certain personal care products, like soaps, makeup, or hair dyes, may be allergens. If you’re having trouble identifying the cause, consider keeping a diary to see what substances or other things cause the most reaction. If this is a chronic problem talk to your doctor about allergy testing.
Hemorrhoid cream may do more harm than good, however, especially when used on the sensitive skin around the eyes or eyelids. Some hemorrhoid creams contain steroids, which can cause or worsen cataracts and glaucoma if used near the eyes. The eyes may also become irritated after using such creams.
Vitamin K 90 mcg per day for adult women; 120 mcg per day for adult men; 10–20 mcg per day for infants; 15–100 mcg per day for children and teens Regulates blood clotting; used in creams to reduce puffy and aging eyes Spinach; swiss chard; kale; broccoli; avocado; grapes; kiwi; soybean
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