The skin around your eyes is very thin, making them extremely sensitive. When skin here comes into contact with allergens floating in the air such as pollen, animal dander, or dust mites, swelling is the result. Adding to the puffiness are allergens that reach the eyes through your nose. 
Parabens are a class of preservatives commonly found in cosmetics, as well as other hygiene products like toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. They’re used to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi — things that you absolutely do not want around your eyes. But they’ve recently come under scrutiny out of a fear that paraben exposure is linked to some types of cancer. One of the larger questions surrounding parabens, particularly since 90% of typical grocery items contain them, is whether they are safe in small doses but become harmful as they accumulate in large doses. In other words, you might be fine if you have parabens only in your toothpaste, but not if they’re in every product you use on a daily basis.
Our two other finalists in this category were Philosophy Miracle Worker Eye Cream and Clinique Smart Custom-Repair Eye Treatment. Both absorbed easily and performed well, but testers weren’t quite as enthusiastic about them, lodging a handful of complaints about residue that felt sticky or overly drying. Still, if you want to explore additional brands, feedback was largely positive and both creams have all the powerhouse ingredients necessary to get the job done. All of our pump-based creams cost about the same — Estee ($66), Philosophy ($68), and Clinique ($50) — while our $14 rollerball surprised us with its performance and price.
If I don’t wear makeup, it is inevitable that someone will approach me and ask if I had a late night. Something about my under-eye skin says, “I’ve never slept a day in my life.” And it’s not just me, either — my mother and sister are the exact same way. Last year, we held a conference over Christmas to discuss our collective genetic flaw: sunken, dark Robert Durst eyes. Since I’m the skin-care expert of the bunch, I promised I’d do all I could to figure out what would help. And as a result, I’ve tried just about every eye product out there. As it turns out, my sensitive skin is especially sensitive to eye treatments — I’ll often get redness and irritation when I’m trying new eye products. But after months of research (and more than a few rashes), I feel I’ve finally reached a place where I can confidently share with you (and the long-suffering female members of my family) the best eye products for dark, dry, puffy-in-the-morning serial-killer eyes.
This is my favorite under-eye product, and don’t make me tell you again why I love snail so much! Its regenerative properties not only work wonders on blemish scars, but also help with any kind of hyperpigmentation, including dark under-eye circles. It’s also super beneficial for helping with wrinkles and dryness. I keep these in the fridge, so they’re nice and cold when I use them — adding another level of luxury to the experience.
Waking up with puffy, swollen eyes is a major bummer—especially if you need to arrive at work looking bright and alert, or you’re tired of masking the puffiness with makeup. Even worse is when the puff is accompanied by dark circles, redness, underye bags, and/or irritation. It’s not a pretty look, and it can do a number on your self-esteem.
Talk with your doctor if you have year-round or seasonal allergies. Allergies can cause your eyes to redden, swell, and puff up. This prompts you to rub your eyes more, resulting in further puffiness. Your doctor can help create a treatment plan to alleviate your symptoms. This may include eye drops and over-the-counter or prescription medication.
It is very effective for eye puffiness and fine lines but not very effective for severe eye bags, dark circles, and deep wrinkles. There are many good customer feedback and testimonials but there are also negative ones saying it isn’t very effective. It is dermatologist tested and fragrance-free but some people may be allergic to certain ingredients of this eye cream. It is one of the most affordable eye creams on the market ($24.99).
VLCC’s Skin Defense Almond Under Eye Cream claims to be the perfect caretaker for your eyes. It contains chamomile extract, olive oil, wheat germ extract, and vitamin E. The product helps soothe and moisturize your skin while treating puffiness and dark circles.
Elevating the head while sleeping can prevent the gravitational redistribution of fluid that is associated with eye swelling. A low-carb diet can prevent eye puffiness by preventing water retention.[citation needed] Eating foods rich in vitamins, especially A, C and E, helps to reduce eye puffiness and to maintain clear, moist skin.[9]
Only one of our retinoid-based products had heavy enough coverage to fall into our “heavy coverage” category: SkinMedica Uplifting Eye Serum ($60). Most of our testers weren’t huge fans of this option. It was repeatedly called out for being sticky and “gloopy,” and several testers felt that it didn’t absorb into their skin at all, instead sitting in a thick layer on top of it. That said, if you have extremely dry skin, SkinMedica has the power to provide an extra level of hydration that we didn’t get anywhere else, with one tester describing the cream as “thick and luxurious.” It all comes down to skin type and personal preference: What feels overpowering on oily skin is likely to be a blessed relief to someone constantly battling dryness.
You should try and put some olive oil or castor oil on under your eyes before you go to bed.. It definitely helps! Made from Earth even makes an eye cream which has olive oil in it for use under the eyes called the Olive Night Cream. . .
Puffiness under the eyes is a common symptom of allergies, lack of sleep, stress, and poor diet. Eyes will become puffy when the skin around the eyes becomes irritated and itchy. People who consume large amounts of alcohol and sodium before bed may wake up with puffy eyes due to water retention.
The solution here is a no-brainer: turn in earlier, so you can get 7-9 hours of sleep each night, and create a bedroom environment that’s conducive to catching zzz’s, says Dr. Jaliman. That means not eating or watching too much TV in bed, so your mind associates the bedroom with sleeping only. And no gadget-reading in bed either. The blue light from many digital devices is a sneaky culprit that keeps your brain wired.
If your eyes are guilty of betraying your lack of sleep, treat them to This Works’s No Wrinkles Tired Eyes which – as the name suggests – is dedicated to hiding the signs of late nights and early starts. No, it’s not as good as getting your full eight hours, but it does include hyaluronic acid to plump, plant extracts to encourage cell renewal and a secret “superblend” to tackle dark circles.

One of the most common home remedies, as mentioned above, is the temporary use of hemorrhoid creams and ointments to reduce the puffiness in eyelids. A common active ingredient in these preparations is phenylephrine, a medication that constricts blood vessels, reducing their diameter.
The American Academy of Dermatology suggests that all people wear sunscreen. Broad-spectrum protection against UVA and UVB rays is important. So is choosing a formula that is SPF 30 or higher and water-resistant. Reapply as necessary or directed on the package instructions. Choose a daily face moisturizer that’s also SPF 30 or higher.
There was no single “correct” set of results. You might prefer a lighter or heavier lotion based on skin type or personal preference — one that soaks in quickly and leaves no trace, versus one that absorbs slowly and leaves behind a luxurious spa feel. There are, accordingly, lighter and heavy creams. So we asked our testers to rate how quickly each product absorbed, and split the results into light, medium, and heavy coverage. We also kept an eye out for any uniformly negative side-effects, dinging a few formulas that received repeated complaints from testers about being sticky (yuck) or overly drying. Even though one tester found SkinMedica to feel luxurious, all other testers described it as “gloopy,” or like the sticky feeling that comes from “pulling a sticker off and leaving goop behind.” Revision received similar complaints.
“I have pretty bad dark circles (genetics, unfortunately) and have tried everything from super expensive to drugstore brands. It wasn’t until this that I noticed a difference—literally, after a day of using it. It’s super lightweight and makes it looks like I hit snooze just a little longer each morning.” —Azadeh Valanejad, social video producer
“I’m one of the people who thinks eye creams are kind of BS—a regular light moisturizer does that trick just fine for me—but I’ve recently noticed how damn puffy my area looks. Blame it on December cheer, an excess of salt, and not enough water, but I started using this collagen-rich gel—which I keep in the fridge—and found it actually works to de-puff and hydrate. It also promises to blur fine lines, which I didn’t experience yet, but I’m planning to stick with it, mainly thanks to its powerful helix complex—an organic compound rich in allantoin, collagen, elastin, and glycolic acid.” —Perrie Samotin, digital deputy editor
As a moisturizer, an eye cream may increase water content of skin and temporarily improve the appearance of the skin. But so will many well-formulated facial moisturizers for a fraction of the cost. Consider trying these home remedies for puffy eyes and dark circles instead, and make sure you’re educated on the secrets the beauty industry doesn’t want you to know to avoid getting swindled in the future.
Dark circles under the eyes come from genes, sun damage, age, and blood build-up. Sodium ascorbate, or vitamin C, can thicken the skin and help conceal dark circles after about 6 months. Niacinamide, or vitamin B3, and kojic acid can lighten dark circles.
During an allergic reaction, certain cells in the body release a chemical called histamine that has many adverse effects on body tissues, including fluid leakage from the blood vessels. These fluids become trapped in surrounding tissues, causing edema.
Before applying a cream, I would suggest to use a skin roller to create tiny holes in the skin so the cream is delivered to deeper layers of skin. See today’s groupon goods deal for derma roller and collagen cream.
Handle your face with care. The skin around your eyes is fragile, and it can get stretched out and damaged by rough handling and exposure to chemicals. To prevent the skin around your eyes from getting loose and filling with fluid, change your routine so that you’re treating your face more gently.
Here’s what happens: As you age, fat deposits that typically support the eyes begin to sag, causing a puffing effect, says Dr. McLaughlin. The tissue and muscles surrounding the eyes weaken as well, adding to the swollen appearance. Puffiness caused by genetics and age isn’t usually a medical concern. “It’s reasonable to say you’re predisposed to having puffy eyes. I’ve seen people whose skin hasn’t aged a bit, but it can be the other way too,” he adds.
How do you find the perfect eye cream? First up, you need to decide what you want it to do. Do you want it to smooth out wrinkles? Depuff bags? Minimise circles? Or all of the above plus colour correcting, brightening and tightening too? Eye creams come in very small pots with very big promises – and often even bigger price tags – but the secret is in finding the ones that really deliver on the specific issues you want to address. There are hydrating eye creams designed to refresh and awaken eyes in the morning, powerful formulas targeted at rejuvenating and renewing as you sleep, and products designed for instant effects and much-needed dark-circle minimising after long sleepless nights. Save yourself trawling through the myriad different options with Vogue’s guide to 10 of the best eye creams on the market – and what they’re good for – below.
Yes, it’s expensive. But La Mer’s Lifting Eye Serum really does deliver, using kelp-infused actives and the brand’s Stretch Matrix Complex to lift, tighten and contour the area around the eyes. The formula is lightweight, gel-like and refreshing – apply to drooping lids to lift and smooth.
Can you wear retinoids during the day? Yes and no. Retinoids have an exfoliating effect on the skin, scrubbing away dead skin, and the more powerful they are, the more effective they are. This means that they can make your skin more sensitive to UV radiation, but it depends both on how sensitive your skin is, and the strength of the retinoid in your eye cream. An easy fix is to wear sunscreen overtop to protect your skin. However, we still recommend wearing these creams at night, because there is some research that sunlight can degrade retinols and make them less effective.
I am a huge fan of coconut oil and make all my own hand and face creams with it. We live by “if you wouldn’t put it in your mouth why would you rub it into your skin and into your blood stream?”. For some reason the cream will go bad though if left on the counter. It takes about 2 months or so but it will go dark and break up around the edges. It must be because it has had things added. So its important to only make what you will use.
In order to truly get rid of puffy eyes, you must address both of these conditions. Of course, some situations involve more inflammation, while others involve more retained fluids. But almost invariably, puffy swollen eyes are caused by both of these conditions which originate from within. So, to cure puffy eyes, you must treat the symptoms from within.
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 1.6 mg for adult males per day; 1.2 mg for adult females per day; 1.5 mg to 1.7 mg for pregnant or lactating women Prevents itchy eyes, which can cause puffiness; helps to maintain good vision Fish; egg yolks; brewer’s yeast; liver; whole grain cereal
Some of the above are symptoms of orbital cellulitis. Although orbital cellulitis is not as common a disease as conjunctivitis, it does have devastating effects. When left untreated, it can lead to very serious complications such as a blood infection or meningitis.
[otp_overlay]